He rode to the moon and back

HP's Homestead/Wolfe campus is giving way to Apple's new spaceship HQ. Jobst Brandt used to work at this location.

HP’s Homestead/Wolfe campus is giving way to Apple’s new spaceship HQ. Jobst Brandt used to work at this location.

I stopped by to see Jobst Brandt and as I was there I thought about all the miles he’s ridden. My estimate is nearly 500,000 miles, or to the moon and back.

He rode a bike since childhood, but I figure he had 50 years riding 10,000 miles a year, and that is a number he has used in correspondence. I have no doubt it’s true.

For a while in the 1970s, Jobst rode from his home in Palo Alto to the HP facility at Homestead and Wolfe Road in Cupertino. For a time I also worked nearby on Tantau and it was about 14 miles one way via Foothill Boulevard. Jobst rode both ways on most days, and on Sundays anywhere from 50 to 130 miles.

When he worked at HP Labs in Palo Alto, he always rode the Loop — Sand Hill Road, Portola Road, Alpine Road, Arastradero Road. He often complained about merging onto Page Mill Road at the I-280 exit. I hear ya.

For those of you who received the annual woodblock Christmas card, here’s one of my favorites, the avocet. It looks like he started doing these in 1965 and stopped in 2007, from what I could see.

Jobst Brandt woodblock carvings from the 1980s. There's something wrong with this photo. Guess.

Jobst Brandt woodblock carvings from the 1980s. There’s something wrong with this photo. Guess.

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2 Responses to “He rode to the moon and back”

  1. Joanne Says:

    I remember seeing Jobst in Portola Valley as he was commuting to work. He usually had cords on but one pant leg secured as to not get it caught in the chainring. Usually some sort of musette bag over his shoulder and of course no helmet or sunglasses. He would frequently stop to chat to me and my dog. Really miss seeing him out on his bike. That tall yellow bike.

  2. Tim Says:

    Those are the carved blocks? Then the photo is reversed. The design on printing blocks is done “backwards” so that the printed image is in correct orientation.

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