Moorpark Avenue goes on a road diet

August 27, 2015

Moorpark Avenue in West San Jose on a road diet. I had the road all to myself.

Moorpark Avenue in West San Jose on a road diet. I had the road all to myself.


Moorpark Avenue has been put on a road diet, which is a good thing if you’re a cyclist or pedestrian living in West San Jose, and maybe so-so for motorists.

I can understand why the four-lane road was reduced to two lanes and a center turn lane, mainly because there are two schools on Moorpark, Archbishop Mitty High School, DeVargas Elementary School, and Strawberry Park Challenger School nearby.

I rode it around noon on a hot day, so I saw no traffic to speak of, and one bicycle.

If any street needs to go on a road diet in the area, it’s Homestead Road. I see dozens of students walking and riding bikes to and from Homestead High School. Homestead is one of the more congested roads around and it’s only going to get worse once the Apple campus opens and the Vallco shopping mall gets its multi-billion-dollar makeover.

Unfortunately, we need wide, multi-lane streets like Homestead to support car traffic. If you took them out, there would be worse gridlock at rush hour.

I don’t think road diets are going to get people out of their cars to ride bikes to work. It will certainly make roads safer for students walking and riding to school, but humans are naturally averse to combining exercise with commuting.

I’ve written at length about all the excuses, some of them valid, so for now our best and probably only hope is for the autonomous car to come along.

We don’t like public transit, we don’t like riding bikes, so what other choice is there?

Lower Guadalupe River Trail closed

August 23, 2015

Guadalupe River Trail between Tasman Drive and Gold Street is closed until November.

Guadalupe River Trail between Tasman Drive and Gold Street is closed until November.


In case you were planning to ride on the Guadalupe River Trail, note that it’s closed until November from Tasman Drive to Gold Street in Alviso.

PG&E is working on a gas line that requires levy work.

The other side of the river has a dirt levy, and that’s still open.

“Friday light” lives up to its reputation

August 21, 2015

Pescadero cemetery. Amaryllis belladonna is named after the Greek beauty Amaryllis and bella donna which means beautiful lady in Italian.

Pescadero cemetery. Amaryllis belladonna is named after the Greek beauty Amaryllis and bella donna which means beautiful lady in Italian.


This is my second long ride on a Friday and I’m beginning to believe it’s the lightest traffic day in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

Of course, the drawback is fighting morning traffic in Silicon Valley with a 7:30 a.m. departure. It gives me a chance to see how most people live.

I’m not liking what I’m seeing at the intersection of Homestead Road and Bernardo Avenue. Parents jam up the intersection turning right from Homestead, which blocks the bike lane for at least eight car lengths. I’d never want my children to ride to Cupertino Middle School on Bernardo.

On top of that, there’s no bike lane on Bernardo. Who wants their children to ride a bike to school? That’s what I figured. Nobody, and I can’t blame them.

But I digress. Once I got onto Moody Road, things got better. It was clear sailing the rest of the way until Old La Honda Road, where quite a few motorists braved the drive up to Skyline. That’s what happens when Hwy 84 closes from a downed tree.

In addition to no traffic, the weather couldn’t have been better. High clouds and temps in the 60s.

There might be one benefit from the drought. I’ve never seen so many belladonna flowers. Bellissimo!

Loma Mar store. It's going to be a while before it's finished. They also need a new sign.

Loma Mar store. It’s going to be a while before it’s finished. They also need a new sign.

Sigma rear brake light gives warning

August 20, 2015
The unobtrusive Sigma rear brake light has a bright LED

The unobtrusive Sigma rear brake light has a bright LED

I immediately liked the concept of the Sigma rear brake light — lightweight (7 grams), easy to install, affordable ($10), a safety feature.

Here’s what I think after making a purchase.

Installation is not as easy as it looks. I had to back out the Shimano Ultegra adjustment barrel all the way to accommodate the light. They recommend at least 25 mm of exposed brake cable.

Be sure to push the light firmly against the brake cable in order for the screw to securely clamp the brake cable.

I’d like to see a better fit for the screw against the cable. As it is now, it mashes down on the brake cable.

Test to see that the brake light doesn’t get stuck on. That can happen, if it’s not installed properly.

You’ll need a 2.5 mm Allen key. The light comes with a CR1025 lithium battery, which should last at least a year or two.

It comes in five colors, but I think red and white have the best visibility against the red LED.

Now you can see when your ride partner is braking while descending Page Mill Road, or motorists can know when you’re stopping for a light, assuming they’re not looking down while texting.

Available now at the Bicycle Outfitter, Los Altos, and other fine bike shops.

Once Upon a Ride: A Back Out of Whack

August 16, 2015

Riders from left: Ted Mock, Olaf Brandt, Peter Johnson, Jobst Brandt, Paul Mittelstadt, stop for a drink of water at the giant redwood tree near McKenzie Reservoir.

Riders from left: Ted Mock, Olaf Brandt, Peter Johnson, Jobst Brandt, Paul Mittelstadt, stop for a drink of water at the giant redwood tree near McKenzie Reservoir.


May 20, 1984
Riders: Jobst Brandt, Paul Mittelstadt, Ray Hosler, Peter Johnson, Jan Causey, Ted Mock, Olaf Brandt
Route: Foothill Expressway to Stevens Canyon Road, Mount Eden Road, Pierce Road, Hwy 9, Sanborn Road, Black Road, Summit Road, Bear Creek Road, Big Basin Road, Hwy 236, Hwy 9, Skyline Boulevard, Hwy 84.
Weather: Warm and clear, then cooler and overcast
Tire/Mechanical Failure: Jan – broken spoke

Jobst is still contending with his back back, which he now thinks is somehow related to a “leaking” kidney. Once again, Jan and Olaf came along to ride with Jobst.

Jobst established a leisurely pace and it was readily apparent he was not feeling up to par. Only on Mt. Eden Road did Jobst ride with any strength.

From the top of Mt. Eden we saw a valley of fruit orchards and neat rows of vineyards. We passed Mount Eden winery on our way downhill.

Before the steep descent, Jobst said he can ride down it without braking “only if I don’t have a tailwind.” After the descent Ray said, “I missed hitting that rabbit by a hair.” Groans were heard.

While climbing Pearce Road, the riders passed a tourist listening to his Sony Walkman. As we passed Paul Masson Winery and the tourist, Jobst said in his loudest voice, “I read in the papers yesterday about a Muni bus driver in San Francisco who was wearing his Sony Walkman. A policeman stopped him when he ran two stop lights.”

On Hwy 9 Jobst mentioned a beechnut tree near the bridge crossing a creek and as we passed a roadside campground next to Sanborn Road, he said, “I can smell the Oscar Meyer weiners already.”

We started up the steep Sanborn Road and enjoyed the canopy of trees between deep, rapid breaths. The real climbing started when we headed up the dirt road at the end of paved Sanborn.

It’s about 25 percent in places to start, but improves to around 18 percent afterwards. We saw McKenzie Reservoir at a low level, but at least it had water. Jobst spotted a Green Heron and a regal-looking Caspian Tern skimming the water.

Leaving the lake, we continued on the dirt road, passing a mother and her two children riding bikes. With that most unusual sight behind us, we arrived at the giant redwood tree where a creek runs across the road.

Jobst stopped to look inside the hollow trunk, but did not see any bats. Then he walked over to the creek and took a drink from one of his regular water holes.

We continued another mile to Black Road and began a steep climb to Skyline Boulevard. Jobst rode home via Skyline, still complaining about his back, while Ray continued on alone to Big Basin State Park.

At the park Ray met up with Bob Walmsley, another Jobst rider, and they discussed Ted Mock’s latest encounter with a car, but fortunately this time he was wearing a helmet. His helmet split in two from the collision.

McKenzie Reservoir drinks in the sunshine

August 14, 2015

Two deer ambled down to the lake for a drink as I snapped the photo.

Two deer ambled down to the lake for a drink as I snapped the photo.


I’ve been riding past McKenzie Reservoir on Lake Ranch Road since 1980, but the good news now is that it’s sanctioned by the county.

In May 1984 Jobst and friends rode by here and stopped to drink from a stream that runs by a big redwood next to the road. I’m not so inclined to drink from local streams these days with the drought and increased pollution making it less appetizing.

As happened in 1984, I saw a gaggle of kids riding by, part of a commercial business catering to youth summer camps, Bike Dojo.

While that’s all well and good, when I was a kid we explored our local parks and trails unsupervised, something that would be unthinkable in today’s world. How times have changed.

Freehub upkeep needed for Ultegra FH-6700

August 10, 2015

A new Shimano freehub includes a ring spacer, body and threaded barrel where the Allen key fits. Lower race with rubber O-ring shown.

A new Shimano freehub includes a ring spacer, body and threaded barrel where the Allen key fits. Lower race with rubber O-ring shown.


Anything with ball bearings needs maintenance, so don’t forget your Shimano freehub.

The freehub, as it’s called to distinguish it from the traditional freewheel that threads onto the hub, has a total of 50 1/8″ bearings on two races, upper and lower.

The upper race is unavailable for maintenance (bearing replacement) unless you take apart the entire freehub, which is no easy task. RJ the Bike Guy shows you how to do it, if you’re interested. You’ll need a special tool, which he shows you how to make. RJ couldn’t find the specialty removal tool online, nor could I.

Personally, I wouldn’t bother. A new freehub costs about $32.

However, cleaning the freehub can add to its lifespan. That’s an assumption. I can’t prove it, but based on experience with similar situations, I suspect it’s true.

That means removing the freehub from the wheel. You’ll need a 10 mm Allen key. I recommend a socket wrench with a 10 mm fitting because the freehub is usually on tight and you’ll need leverage.

RJ the Bike Guy takes you through the process in his video.

I’m not a fan of using solvents for cleaning, so I use Simple Green, an alkaline aqueous solution that does a great job. Just let it sit for a while, rinse the freehub with water and then dry thoroughly.

Note that while Simple Green is more environmentally friendly than solvents, it should still be disposed of according to hazardous waste rules in your area. Don’t dump used Simple Green filled with bike grease sludge down the drain.

I added some car oil to soak onto the top bearing race and car grease in the lower bearing race before putting back the lower race’s rubber O-ring. Be sure to install the O-ring the way it came out. Instructions show the correct orientation.

My freehub is four years old and has about 24,000 miles. I haven’t noticed any problems and the bearings look fine.

As an aside, I wonder why Shimano would say “Fabrique au Japon” on its packaging? I can only speculate it has to do with France’s law mandating the use of French under the Toubon law passed in 1994.

Instructions include English, Japanese, German, French, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Swedish. Speak some other language? You’re out of luck.

Once Upon a Ride: Last Chance to turn back

August 2, 2015

Peter Johnson crosses to the south side of Waddell Creek on Last Chance Road.

Peter Johnson crosses to the south side of Waddell Creek on Last Chance Road.


Oct. 12, 1986
Riders: Jobst Brandt, Ray Hosler, Peter Johnson, Mike and Jean Higgins, Charlie Kempner
Route: Alpine Road to Skyline, Hwy 9, 236, Last Chance Road, Swanton Road, Hwy 1, Gazos Creek Road, Cloverdale Road, Pescadero Road, Alpine Road, Page Mill Road
Tire/Mechanical Failure: None

This was the first ride I had been on with Jobst since his accident in France on July 11. Jobst has already gone on three Sunday rides, including trails. He appears to be as strong as ever after breaking his leg.

We headed out on Alma Street in Palo Alto, our usual route, and crossed El Camino Real. Charlie and I peeled off onto El Camino going north because we saw a cop turning left onto Alma from El Camino. Jobst and Peter charged ahead across El Camino, ignoring the cop. It’s illegal to cross here [that has changed].

The cop turned on his lights and stopped Peter, but Jobst rode on. Charlie and I caught up with Peter and listened in.
Cop: “You know you’re not supposed to do what you did. I’m not going to give you a ticket but I am going to give you a lecture.”
Peter: “Yeah, but officer how would you take that intersection? I’ve been doing it this way for 20 years. What did we do wrong?”
Cop: “What did you do wrong?! You should know! You crossed a divided road, ran a stop light and…”

The conversation carried on way too long.

After the lecture, we continued on our way up Sand Hill Road. We caught up with Jobst, and Mike and Jean riding their tandem on Alpine Road.

On dirt Alpine the bridge is still missing, but we managed to ride down into the creek and out without stopping [turns out it was just buried in debris]. There’s still a washout farther up.

At Skyline Charlie peeled off and went down Alpine while we continued south on Skyline into the fog, stopping for water at the fire station before Hwy 9.

In Big Basin state park we stopped to eat and discussed the road ahead. Jobst suggested Last Chance Road. After some protest from Jean about riding on dirt, she finally agreed and we were on our way. During their husband-wife discussion, Jobst burst out laughing at the familiar dialogue.

Last Chance had been graded all the way and was in better shape than I’ve seen it in a long time [it’s a trail now, but at least maintained.

I had to walk down the bad stretch that parallels Waddell Creek where we went for a swim a few years back, but Jobst and Peter charged ahead through the loose dirt and rocks. Mike and Jean walked down the hill.

We bumped along over the washboard on Last Chance Road out to the coast and then headed north without a headwind, so we made good time.

This was our first ride on Cloverdale Road since it was oiled and graveled.

At Loma Mar Store we stopped for a bite to eat and to talk with the owner, Roger. He told us about the time he stopped thieves and held them at gunpoint until the sheriff arrived.

We headed back up Alpine Road where Jobst caught up with Palo Alto photographer Bill Ziegler riding his bike. It was a lovely fall day in the late afternoon, a great way to end a 93-mile ride.

East Ridge Trail where have you been?

August 1, 2015

Anybody missing a toy? They're at the Big Basin Park maintenance yard.

Anybody missing a toy? They’re at the Big Basin Park maintenance yard.


As I look around for the remaining trails I haven’t ridden (filling my bucket list), I stumbled across East Ridge Trail in Big Basin Redwoods State Park.

I’m told Jobst had ridden it, but I imagine not often. I headed out today to see what I was missing. As it turns out, not much.

East Ridge Trail is an old logging road, I’m guessing (aren’t they all?), not really a trail, which is why it’s open for bikes. No single-track is open in Big Basin Redwoods State Park.

I picked it up on the right a few hundred yards down China Grade after turning left at Hwy 236. You can’t miss the trail. There’s a big iron gate and a sign that says authorized vehicles only.

After a brief climb, the road starts a short descent into a saddle and at the low point there’s a dirt road off to the right that descends fairly steeply. That goes to Rogers Road and the state parks maintenance area. It’s open for bikes.

I continued on East Ridge Trail uphill. The 1.1-mile road, as you might imagine, follows a ridge and that means plenty of up and down. There’s one climb that’s impossible to ride because it’s about 35 percent and loose. But try anyway.

The road dumps out onto the little-used Lodge Road. I’m betting Lodge sees fewer cars than any road in the Santa Cruz Mountains. It’s a goat trail and doesn’t really go anywhere special.

I headed right because I wanted to check out Rogers Road and the trail I chose not to take.

After two miles I came to a junction and headed straight into more “authorized vehicles only” territory, the park maintenance yard. While there I got into a conversation with one of the park workers. That’s when I noticed a tree stump covered with all kinds of toys, left behind by park users over the years.

Anyway, the road I didn’t take comes into Rogers Road. Check it out. It’s all downhill, as opposed to East Ridge. There’s another trail that comes into the park maintenance area, but that’s one of those Once Upon a Ride reports.

East Ridge Trail where it crosses Lodge Road in Big Basin State Park.

East Ridge Trail where it crosses Lodge Road in Big Basin State Park.

Mammoth display trumpets bone discovery

July 28, 2015
Mammoth artwork at Trimble Road and Guadalupe River trail.

Mammoth artwork at Trimble Road and Guadalupe River trail.

Mammoth bones were removed for study.

Mammoth bones were removed for study.


Remember 2005 when they found the mammoth bones in the Guadalupe River next to Trimble Road? Who can forget?

Now there’s a life-size mammoth artwork on display next to the discovery site. It looks much better than that coiled snake in downtown San Jose.

With my life back in order, I toured the Alviso Slough/Guadalupe Slough levy, which is in great shape now that the gravel put down in the first mile has settled.

It’s pretty amazing that gravel sinks into the ground the way it does. It just seems to disappear.

Lots of lone white pelicans, egrets, cormorants swimming around. Even a couple of night herons made a showing.

Alviso levy on a warm morning.

Alviso levy on a warm morning.


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