Rocking and rolling at the Tour de France

RockShox would have come in handy at the Tour de France yesterday. Los Altos History Museum display.

RockShox would have come in handy at the Tour de France yesterday. Los Altos History Museum display.


While riding cobbles of the famed Paris-Roubaix route in stage 6 of the Tour de France may make for good TV, the participants were none too pleased.

Lots of racers crashed and we know the rest of the story. The course got cut short to reduce the carnage. So why didn’t the riders use front suspension or even full suspension?

It turns out they could and they have since 1991 when the original RockShox suspension was put to the test at Paris-Roubaix.

Greg LeMond used it and his French teammate Gilbert Duclos-Lasalle (Team Z) rode to victory on RockShox front suspension in 1992. After that lots of teams used them on the cobbles, but then they disappeared, later to return.

Bike Radar does a great job detailing the history.

Today they’re not used. I suspect the reason is that there’s not enough of an advantage with today’s carbon fiber bikes absorbing a lot of vibration compared to steel bikes. Not all of the Paris-Roubaix covers cobblestones. The extra weight and spongy suspension (some suspensions can be locked) slows riders down on the long sections of smooth road.

If you want to see the original bike used in the Paris-Roubaix and live in the South Bay, you’re in luck. It’s on display at the Los Altos History Museum, located right behind the library on San Antonio Road.

Bay Area natives Paul Turner and Steve Simons get credit for starting RockShox, now owned by Sram.

The bike exhibit “Pedal Power: From Wacky to Workhorse” runs through October 5. No charge.

Thanks to all who donated bikes. Several came from Vance Sprock, Cupertino Bike Shop owner.

Original RockShox suspension used in the Paris-Roubaix

Original RockShox suspension used in the Paris-Roubaix

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